Five Stories That Matter in Michigan This Week – April 12, 2024

  1. U of M Economists Project Michigan Economic Growth for Year Ahead

Economists from the University of Michigan recently released the annual Michigan Economic Outlook for 2024-25. The Outlook projects economic growth for the year ahead, including approximately 38,000 new jobs in 2024.

Why it Matters: This year’s expected job growth comes on the heels of a slowdown in employment in Michigan during the second half of last year, according to the report.

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  1. April Business Education Series

In the dynamic landscape of business, where adaptability is key, the importance of having robust Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) cannot be overstated. SOPs serve as the backbone of organizational efficiency, ensuring consistency, compliance, and continuous improvement.

Why it Matters: The April Business Education Series, “Optimizing Operations: The Crucial Role of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs),” led by Brittany Parks, founder and principal Consultant, Brittany Parks Process Consulting, is designed to equip participants with the knowledge, skills, and tools to harness the transformative power of SOPs in their respective organizations. Learn more and to register.

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  1. Michigan Cannabis Exceeds $288 Million in March ‘24

Cannabis sales surpassed $288 million in March, via the monthly report from the Michigan Cannabis Regulatory Agency. Michigan adult-use sales came in at $286,790,258.52, while medical sales came in at $2,053,021.25, totaling $288,843,279.77.

Why it Matters: Marijuana sales remain strong in Michigan, particularly for recreational use. However, there still are significant concerns about profitability and market oversaturation that the industry is contending with.

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  1. The Uniform Power of Attorney Act

The Uniform Power of Attorney Act (UPOAA or Act), 2023 PA 187, was signed into law in November 2023 and goes into effect July 1, 2024. It repeals Michigan’s current statutory law on durable powers of attorney, specifically Sections 700.5501-700.5505 of the Estates and Protected Individuals Code (EPIC). The UPOAA is not part of EPIC, instead, it is a stand-alone statute located at MCL 556.201 et. seq.

Why it Matters: The UPOAA will apply to all powers of attorney in Michigan beginning July 1, 2024, with certain exceptions. Read more from attorney Melisa M.W. Mysliwiec.

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  1. Ten Reasons Why You May Want to Consider a Family Cottage Succession Plan

The goal of cottage succession planning is to set up legal ground rules that provide the best chance to keep a cottage in the family for future generations.

Why it Matters: A cottage plan usually addresses concerns through the creative use of a limited liability company (LLC), or a trust (typically used for more favorable treatment associated with the uncapping of taxable value), to own the property. Learn more from cottage law attorney Mark Kellogg.

Related Practice Groups and Professionals

Cannabis Law | Sean Gallagher
Trusts & Estates | Melisa M.W. Mysliwiec
Cottage Law | Mark Kellogg

Five Stories That Matter in Michigan This Week – March 29, 2024

  1. Cannabis Regulatory Agency Takes Disciplinary Action

The Michigan Cannabis Regulatory Agency recently released its February 2024 Disciplinary Action Report, which details administrative formal complaints and disciplinary actions taken against adult-use/medical licensees in February by the CRA. The list is extensive, and the disciplinary action imposed ranges from fines to license suspension.

Why it Matters: Michigan cannabis rules and regulation are complex, cumbersome, and, as we see from the CRA’s most recent Disciplinary Action Report, aggressively enforced by the agency. For assistance in understanding and complying with Michigan’s cannabis industry regulatory framework, please contact a member of our Cannabis Law team.

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  1. Corporate Transparency Act Update

As anticipated, the finding by a federal judge in Alabama that the Corporate Transparency Act is unconstitutional has prompted (or at least been echoed by) challenges elsewhere, including in federal courts in Maine and in Michigan. FinCEN filed its appeal notice in the Alabama suit earlier this month, meaning that a decision by the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals may be forthcoming. The suits in Maine and Michigan were brought in courts covered by the 5th and 6th Circuit Courts of Appeals, which could be the beginning of a series of events that brings the question of the CTA’s constitutionality before the United States Supreme Court as a result of a possible Circuit split.

Why it Matters: Reporting companies that were formed prior to January 1, 2024, may find it advantageous to continue collecting their beneficial owner information but postpone filing the report until some of these matters have worked through their respective processes. Entities created on or after January 1, 2024, however, will still need to file their reports within 90 days of filing their organizing documents, as their reporting obligations have not been excused. Learn more from attorney Bob Burgee.

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  1. Michigan Cannabis Exceeds $261 Million in February ‘24

Cannabis sales surpassed $242 million in February, via the monthly report from the Michigan Cannabis Regulatory Agency. Michigan adult-use sales came in at $258,857,645.20, while medical sales came in at $2,178,744.68, totaling $261,036,389.88.

Why it Matters: Marijuana sales remain strong in Michigan, particularly for recreational use. However, there still are significant concerns about profitability and market oversaturation that the industry is contending with.

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  1. A Health Professional’s Guide to Navigating the Disciplinary Process: What to Expect if You Are Facing a Professional Licensing Investigation or Administrative Complaint

Health professionals are committed to caring for patients with expertise, compassion, and integrity. However, in the heavily regulated healthcare field, those professionals can sometimes find themselves navigating not just the medical challenges of their patients but licensing issues of their own as well. Licensing issues can arise unexpectedly, and, when they do, they can cause tremendous stress and uncertainty.

Why it Matters: As an attorney with years of experience handling professional licensing matters for health professionals, Robert J. Andretz has witnessed firsthand how professional licensing investigations and Administrative Complaints can disrupt health professionals’ careers and their ability to provide patient care. He will explore how to navigate the disciplinary process in Michigan so that you can know what to expect if you are ever faced with a threat to your license. Learn more.

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  1. The Uniform Power of Attorney Act

The Uniform Power of Attorney Act (UPOAA or Act), 2023 PA 187, was signed into law in November 2023 and goes into effect July 1, 2024. It repeals Michigan’s current statutory law on durable powers of attorney, specifically Sections 700.5501-700.5505 of the Estates and Protected Individuals Code (EPIC). The UPOAA is not part of EPIC, instead, it is a stand-alone statute located at MCL 556.201 et. seq.

Why it Matters: The UPOAA will apply to all powers of attorney in Michigan beginning July 1, 2024, with certain exceptions. Read more from attorney Melisa M.W. Mysliwiec.

Related Practice Groups and Professionals

Cannabis Law | Sean Gallagher
Business & Tax | Robert Burgee
Health Care Law Robert Andretz
Trusts & Estates | Melisa M.W. Mysliwiec

Five Stories That Matter in Michigan This Week – March 22, 2024

  1. The Uniform Power of Attorney Act

The Uniform Power of Attorney Act (UPOAA or Act), 2023 PA 187, was signed into law in November 2023 and goes into effect July 1, 2024. It repeals Michigan’s current statutory law on durable powers of attorney, specifically Sections 700.5501-700.5505 of the Estates and Protected Individuals Code (EPIC). The UPOAA is not part of EPIC, instead, it is a stand-alone statute located at MCL 556.201 et. seq.

Why it Matters: The UPOAA will apply to all powers of attorney in Michigan beginning July 1, 2024, with certain exceptions. Read more from attorney Melisa M.W. Mysliwiec.

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  1. Can an Out-of-State Patent Attorney Represent Me?

Securing a patent for an innovative idea involves maneuvering through a complex, multifaceted process. And having the right guide—patent legal counsel—is an essential part of the process. A common misconception is that a party hoping to secure a patent must turn to a local attorney for help. This belief, while understandable considering that many legal matters require local expertise and licensing, overlooks the dynamics of how things work with patent law.

Why it Matters: The truth is, in the digital age, the geographical location of your patent attorney matters less than their expertise, experience, and ability to navigate the United States Patent and Trademark Office’s (“USPTO”) requirements. Learn more from attorney Andrew Martin.

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  1. Michigan CRA Publishes February Data: Average Price Decreases

Per data released by the Cannabis Regulatory Agency (CRA), the average retail price for adult-use sales of an ounce of cannabis in February was $91.94, a decrease from $93.20 in January. This is an increase from February 2023, where the average price was $86.00.

Why it Matters: While the prices of cannabis and cannabis-related products continue to decrease and make consumers happy, growers on the other hand are seeing profits decrease resulting in them seeking ways to halt new licenses to be granted in an effort to steady prices. Contact our cannabis law attorneys if you have any questions.

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  1. CRA Warns of Scam Targeting Michigan Cannabis Businesses

On March 8, the Michigan Cannabis Regulatory Agency (CRA) sent out an advisory bulletin warning cannabis businesses of an individual posing as an agent of the CRA demanding payment of license fees under the threat of revoking their license(s).

Why it Matters: The CRA noted, “Licensees and applicants are reminded that administrative rules require they notify the CRA and local law enforcement within 24 hours of becoming aware – or within 24 hours of when they should have been aware – of the theft or loss of any product or criminal activity at the marijuana business.”

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  1. Fraser Trebilcock Attorneys Secure Summary Disposition for Firm Client

Fraser Trebilcock attorneys Danielle Lofton and Gary C. Rogers have obtained summary disposition and dismissal of a lawsuit in favor of the firm’s client in a personal injury case pending before the Kalamazoo County Circuit Court.

Why it Matters: Attorney Lofton successfully argued the motion, convincing the trial court that the plaintiff’s injuries did not rise to the level of serious impairment of body function, following mediation in which the plaintiff, who was represented by a prominent plaintiff’s personal injury firm, rejected the settlement recommended by a mediator, and wanted to proceed to trial before a jury. Instead of accepting the mediator’s recommended settlement amount, the plaintiff will now receive nothing. Learn more.

Related Practice Groups and Professionals

Trusts & Estates | Melisa M.W. Mysliwiec
Intellectual Property | Andrew Martin
Cannabis Law | Sean Gallagher
Insurance Law | Danielle Lofton
Insurance Law | Gary Rogers

Five Stories That Matter in Michigan This Week – March 1, 2024

  1. Growing Marijuana in Michigan – No Matter the Amount – is a Misdemeanor

Late last week, the Michigan State Police shut down an illegal marijuana growing facility in Highland Park, seizing 4,000 marijuana plants and processed weed worth $6.3 million. It may surprise readers to know that, pursuant to a Michigan Court of Appeals ruling in October, 2023, the unlicensed growers may only face misdemeanor charges. In another case involving an illegal growing operation, the court ruled that violations that previously were subject to felony punishments should now be prosecuted under the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marijuana Act (the “Act”).

Why it Matters: Under the Act, it’s legal to store up to 10 ounces of marijuana, possess 2.5 ounces and grow up to 12 plants. Violations for exceeding those amounts range from civil infractions to misdemeanors. It will be interesting to see if these provisions will be revisited given that black market sales have been blamed for increased competition and falling prices for legal sales.

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  1. Navigating the Cost and Process of Hiring a Trademark Attorney

In the fast-paced world of business, protecting your brand is paramount. Whether you’re a startup or a large corporation, safeguarding your trademarks is essential for maintaining your identity and reputation in the market. However, navigating the legal intricacies of trademark registration and enforcement can be complex and overwhelming. This is where a skilled trademark attorney can be your greatest ally.

Why it Matters: Without adequate protection, your trademarks are vulnerable to infringement, dilution, and misappropriation, which can result in lost revenue, brand erosion, and legal disputes. By securing federal trademark registration and enforcing your rights, you establish a legal foundation that empowers you to safeguard your brand and its value. Read more from attorney Andrew G. Martin.

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  1. Fraser Trebilcock Attorney Michael E. Cavanaugh Named in Michigan Lawyers Weekly Class of 2024 Hall of Fame

Fraser Trebilcock attorney Michael E. Cavanaugh has been selected as a member of Michigan Lawyers Weekly “Hall of Fame Class of 2024.” This special award recognizes esteemed members of the legal profession who have been in practice for at least 30 years.

Why it Matters: Michigan Lawyers Weekly’s annual “Hall of Fame” award recognizes only twenty-one lawyers each year. These lawyers truly are legends, making their mark in the courtroom or the boardroom, in their firms and with community organizations, and with local, state and national bar associations. With their guidance and mentorship, they have launched hundreds of thriving legal careers and have left an indelible imprint on the profession through precedent-setting cases, high dollar outcomes and successful resolutions for their clients.

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  1. A Health Professional’s Guide to Navigating the Disciplinary Process: What to Expect if You Are Facing a Professional Licensing Investigation or Administrative Complaint

Health professionals are committed to caring for patients with expertise, compassion, and integrity. However, in the heavily regulated healthcare field, those professionals can sometimes find themselves navigating not just the medical challenges of their patients but licensing issues of their own as well. Licensing issues can arise unexpectedly, and, when they do, they can cause tremendous stress and uncertainty.

Why it Matters: As an attorney with years of experience handling professional licensing matters for health professionals, Robert J. Andretz has witnessed firsthand how professional licensing investigations and Administrative Complaints can disrupt health professionals’ careers and their ability to provide patient care. He will explore how to navigate the disciplinary process in Michigan so that you can know what to expect if you are ever faced with a threat to your license. Learn more.

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  1. Increase in the Small Business Property Tax Exemption

Eligibility for the so-called “Small Business Property Tax Exemption” has expanded. Legislation passed last October 2023, expands the exemption by increasing the eligibility limit to from the $80,000 true cash value limit to $180,000.

Why it Matters: The exemption is only for commercial and industrial personal property (residential/individuals are not subject to personal property taxes). Once filed, and if granted, the exemption will remain as long as the small business still qualifies. In other words, there is no need to file an exemption claim every year. Read more.

Related Practice Groups and Professionals

Cannabis Law | Sean Gallagher
Intellectual Property | Andrew Martin
Labor, Employment & Civil Rights | Michael E. Cavanaugh
Professional Licensing | Robert Andretz
Business & Tax | Paul McCord

Five Stories That Matter in Michigan This Week – February 23, 2024

  1. Michigan Awarded Nearly $23 Million for Electric Vehicle Infrastructure

The State of Michigan recently announced that nearly $23 million has been awarded to multiple locations across Michigan for electric vehicle infrastructure. The funds are being allocated via the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Formula Program.

Why it Matters: Electric vehicle growth and EV infrastructure is an important clean energy and economic growth priority in Michigan. However, recent reports suggest the market for EVs is slowing, and the issue has become a hot-button topic in this year’s presidential campaign. A New York Times article discussed the contentiousness of the issue in a story this week titled, “For Michigan’s Economy, Electric Vehicles are Promising and Scary.”

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  1. Increase in the Small Business Property Tax Exemption

Eligibility for the so-called “Small Business Property Tax Exemption” has expanded. Legislation passed last October 2023, expands the exemption by increasing the eligibility limit to from the $80,000 true cash value limit to $180,000.

Why it Matters: The exemption is only for commercial and industrial personal property (residential/individuals are not subject to personal property taxes). Once filed, and if granted, the exemption will remain as long as the small business still qualifies. In other words, there is no need to file an exemption claim every year. Read more.

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  1. Michigan CRA Publishes January 2024 Data: Average Price Decreases

Per data released by the Cannabis Regulatory Agency (CRA), the average retail price for adult-use sales of an ounce of cannabis in January was $93.20, a decrease from $95.08 in December 2023. This is an increase from January 2023, where the average price was $80.16.

Why it Matters: While the prices of cannabis and cannabis-related products continue to decrease and make consumers happy, growers on the other hand are seeing profits decrease resulting in them seeking ways to halt new licenses to be granted in an effort to steady prices. Contact our cannabis law attorneys if you have any questions.

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  1. Michigan’s Repealed “Right-to-Work” Law Takes Effect

On Tuesday, February 13, 2024, Michigan’s repeal of the prior “right-to-work” law governing private-sector workers went into effect.

Why it Matters: The result of the repeal is that private-sector unions may permissibly negotiate to impasse, and enforce, “union security” provisions requiring membership in, or financial support through “Beck Objector” fees, of those unions. Read more.

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  1. Retroactive PPT Exemption

Some Michigan manufacturers who were not able to claim their 2021 ESA-PPT exemption due to COVID-19, have until March 14 to request approval from the State Tax Commission.

Why it Matters: The ESA is a State specific tax on personal property that is exempt from property taxes at the local level because the property meets certain eligibility requirements, such as being qualified manufacturing or industrial personal property. In order to elect out of local personal property taxes and into the ESA regime, manufacturers must file the required forms with their local assessing office by February 20th of each year. Learn more.

Related Practice Groups and Professionals

Energy, Utilities & Telecommunication | Sean Gallagher
Business & Tax | Paul McCord
Cannabis Law | Sean Gallagher
Labor, Employment & Civil Rights | David Houston

Five Stories That Matter in Michigan This Week – January 26, 2024

  1. Michigan Amendment Imposes Reporting Requirement for Broker-Dealers and Investment Advisers to Report Financial Exploitation of Vulnerable Adults

Effective March 13, 2024, an amendment to the Michigan Uniform Securities Act (new Section 451.2533) will take effect that is intended to protect elder and vulnerable adults from financial exploitation. Among other things, the law requires broker-dealers and state-registered investment advisers to report suspected financial exploitation to a law enforcement agency or adult protective services.

Why it Matters: According to the Michigan Department of Attorney General website, more than 73,000 older adults in Michigan are victims of elder abuse, including financial exploitation.

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  1. The DOL Issues Final Rule Creating New Standard for Classifying Workers as Employees vs. Independent Contractors

On January 9, 2024, the United States Department of Labor released its final rule on worker classification under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

Why it Matters: This new rule, effective as of March 11, 2024, signals a return to a standard more likely to classify workers as employees than contractors. Thus, it is more likely that employers will be determined to have misclassified workers as contractors, resulting in liability. Learn more from your Fraser Trebilcock attorney.

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  1. Michigan Federal Judge Dismisses Complaint Against Firm Client

A Michigan federal judge recently dismissed a complaint against the firm’s client represented by attorneys Thaddeus E. Morgan and Ryan K. Kauffman, for lack of subject matter jurisdiction.

Why it Matters: The complaint alleged that the firm’s client, together with another state bar, illegally conspired to prevent the plaintiff from practicing law in their respective states. However, the Eleventh Amendment prohibits a suit brought in federal court against a state, its agencies and officials, unless the state has waived its sovereign immunity or consented to being sued. The Eleventh Amendment limits federal subject matter jurisdiction, and as a result of the state bar functioning as an extension of the state’s Supreme Court, it is a state agency that possesses Eleventh Amendment immunity. Read more.

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  1. Michigan Cannabis Sales Eclipse $3 Billion in 2023

Michigan cannabis sales total $3,057,161,285.85, via the collection of monthly reports from the Michigan Cannabis Regulatory Agency. This is a 30% increase from 2022, which saw total sales at $2,293,823,890.11.

Why it Matters: Marijuana sales remain strong in Michigan, particularly for recreational use. However, there still are significant concerns about profitability and market oversaturation that the industry is contending with.

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  1. Client Alert: PCORI Fees Due by July 31, 2024!

In Notice 2023-70, the Internal Revenue Service set forth the PCORI amount imposed on insured and self-funded health plans for policy and plan years that end on or after October 1, 2023, and before October 1, 2024.

Why it Matters: Notice 2023-70 sets the adjusted applicable dollar amount used to calculate the fee at $3.22. Specifically, this fee is imposed per average number of covered lives for plan years that end on or after October 1, 2023, and before October 1, 2024. For self-funded plans, the average number of covered lives is calculated by one of three methods: (1) the actual count method; (2) the snapshot method; or (3) the Form 5500 method. Learn more from your Fraser Trebilcock attorney.

Related Practice Groups and Professionals

Labor, Employment & Civil Rights | David Houston
Litigation | Ryan Kauffman
Litigation | Thaddeus Morgan
Cannabis Law | Sean Gallagher
Employee Benefits | Bob Burgee
Employee Benefits | Sharon Goldzweig

Five Stories That Matter in Michigan This Week – January 19, 2024

  1. New Michigan Law Mandates Compulsory Arbitration for Higher Education Police Officers

Michigan’s law regarding compulsory arbitration of public labor disputed has been amended to include higher education institution police officers. The change takes effect on January 22, 2024.

Why it Matters: Higher education institutions should assess the impact the new law may have on their workforce.

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  1. Fraser Trebilcock Welcomes Phyllis Dahl to the Firm

We are pleased to announce the hiring of Phyllis Dahl as the firm’s new Office Manager.

Why it Matters: Ms. Dahl has over three decades of experience in the legal industry, having worked at two private law firms before joining Fraser Trebilcock. She has a bachelor’s degree in public administration from Central Michigan University. Read more.

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  1. Client Alert: PCORI Fees Due by July 31, 2024!

In Notice 2023-70, the Internal Revenue Service set forth the PCORI amount imposed on insured and self-funded health plans for policy and plan years that end on or after October 1, 2023, and before October 1, 2024.

Why it Matters: Notice 2023-70 sets the adjusted applicable dollar amount used to calculate the fee at $3.22. Specifically, this fee is imposed per average number of covered lives for plan years that end on or after October 1, 2023, and before October 1, 2024. For self-funded plans, the average number of covered lives is calculated by one of three methods: (1) the actual count method; (2) the snapshot method; or (3) the Form 5500 method. Learn more from your Fraser Trebilcock attorney.

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  1. Michigan Cannabis Pulls in Nearly $280 Million in December

Cannabis sales are just below $280 million in December, via the monthly report from the Michigan Cannabis Regulatory Agency. Michigan adult-use sales came in at $276,732,645.94, while medical sales came in at $3,177,042.62, totaling $279,909,688.56.

Why it Matters: Marijuana sales remain strong in Michigan, particularly for recreational use. However, there still are significant concerns about profitability and market oversaturation that the industry is contending with.

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  1. CRA Publishes December 2023 Data: Average Price Decreases

Per data released by the Cannabis Regulatory Agency (CRA), the average retail price for adult-use sales of an ounce of cannabis in December was $95.08, a small decrease from $97.51 in November. For the second time, this is an increase to the average price when compared to the year prior, when in December 2022, the average price was $90.68.

Why it Matters: While the prices of cannabis and cannabis-related products continue to decrease and make consumers happy, growers on the other hand are seeing profits decrease resulting in them seeking ways to halt new licenses to be granted in an effort to steady prices. Contact our cannabis law attorneys if you have any questions.

Related Practice Groups and Professionals

Higher Education | Ryan Kauffman
Phyllis Dahl
Employee Benefits | Bob Burgee
Employee Benefits | Sharon Goldzweig
Cannabis Law | Sean Gallagher

Five Stories That Matter in Michigan This Week – December 8, 2023

  1. Governor Whitmer Signs Executive Order for State Vehicles to be Zero-Emission by 2040

On Tuesday, Governor Whitmer signed an executive directive mandating the state government to convert its fleet of cars and trucks to zero-emission vehicles by 2040.

Why it Matters: In a statement accompanying the directive, Governor Whitmer stated that the transition would reduce air pollution, help boost demand for Michigan-made electric vehicles, and lower fuel costs. The directive comes on the heels of Governor Whitmer signing legislation that will impose a new 100% clean energy standard for utilities to hit by 2040.

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  1. Patentable vs. Infringing: What’s the Difference?

The patent system is intended to spur innovation, incentivize inventors, and protect against infringement. One of the big challenges innovators face in this realm is understanding patentability and what constitutes infringement.

Why it Matters: The distinction between what is patentable and what is infringing is defined by the scope of the patent claims. For instance, a new invention that improves upon a patented product may still be patentable even though the envisioned product itself may infringe on the patented claims. On the other hand, a product that is not patentable may also infringe granted patents. Learn more from your Fraser Trebilcock attorney.

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  1. Michigan Supreme Court Hears Arguments on Minimum Wage

Earlier this week, the Michigan Supreme Court heard arguments on whether the “adopt-and-amend” actions on two ballot initiatives from 2018 that alter the state’s minimum wage and paid sick leave requirements were constitutional.

Why it Matters: The Michigan Supreme Court is anticipated to make a decision in 2024. If the Supreme Court upholds the adopt-and-amend process that the Court of Appeals deemed constitutional, then employers will operate under the current minimum wage and paid sick leave requirements. However, if the process is found unconstitutional and the Supreme Court overrules the lower court’s decision, then it would reinstate the original 2018 initiatives on minimum wage and paid sick leave requirements.

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  1. Ohio Senate Passes Bill Altering Legal Cannabis Program

On Wednesday, the Ohio Senate voted on a proposal that would alter the state’s legal cannabis program, after voters passed Issue 2 in November, allowing the sale of recreational cannabis to adults 21 years or older.

Why it Matters: The bill now moves onto the House, and if it passes, the Governor has indicated he will sign it. Some of the proposed changes include reducing the number of homegrown plants allowed to 6 (from 12), increasing the tax on sales from 10% to 15%, allowing medicinal shops to sell to recreational users, and altering the way tax revenue would be spent, allocating funds to different programs.

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  1. Michigan Cannabis Sales in Third Quarter Nearly $75 Million More than Second Quarter

Michigan cannabis sales totaled $827,737,257.25 in the third quarter of 2023, a nearly $75 million increase from the second quarter in which sales totaled $752,770,513.25.

Why it Matters: Marijuana sales remain strong in Michigan, particularly for recreational use. However, there still are significant concerns about profitability and market oversaturation that the industry is contending with.

Related Practice Groups and Professionals

Energy, Utilities & Telecommunication | Sean Gallagher
Intellectual Property | Andrew Martin
Labor, Employment & Civil Rights | David Houston
Cannabis Law | Sean Gallagher

Five Stories That Matter in Michigan This Week – October 13, 2023

  1. Cannabis Regulatory Agency Seeks to Update Michigan’s Marihuana Rules

The Michigan Cannabis Regulatory Agency (“CRA”) recently filed a Request for Rulemaking to begin the process of updating Michigan’s Marihuana Rules. The CRA is asking for feedback—comments or suggestions can be sent to CRA-AdminRules@michigan.gov.

Why it Matters: The proposed updates, a summary of which can be found here, would impact licensing, social equity, financial compliance, and a host of other issues.

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  1. Client Alert: October 14 Deadline: Medicare Part D Notice of Creditable (or Non-Creditable) Coverage

Medicare Part D notices (of either creditable or non-creditable coverage) are due for distribution prior to October 15th.

Why it Matters: With respect to group health plans including prescription coverage offered by an employer to any Medicare Part D eligible employees (whether or not retired) or to Medicare Part D Medicare-eligible spouses or dependents, the employer must provide those individuals with a Notice of Creditable or Non-Creditable Coverage to advise them whether the drug plan’s total gross value is at least as valuable as the standard Part D coverage (i.e., creditable). Read more from your Fraser Trebilcock attorney.

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  1. Michigan Cannabis Sales Exceed $274 Million in September

Cannabis sales surpassed $274 million in September, via the monthly report from the Michigan Cannabis Regulatory Agency. Michigan adult-use sales came in at $269,813,092.72, while medical sales came in at $4,915,502.78, totaling $274,728,595.50.

Why it Matters: Marijuana sales remain strong in Michigan, particularly for recreational use. However, there still are significant concerns about profitability and market oversaturation that the industry is contending with.

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  1. U.S. Supreme Court Clarifies Legal Standard for Threatening Speech in Counterman V. Colorado

The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Counterman v. Colorado addressed the longstanding ambiguity surrounding the standards for criminal prosecution based on perceived threats of violence.

Why it Matters: The Court held that such a prosecution requires proof that the defendant subjectively understood the threatening nature of the statement such that making the statement was at least reckless. This case not only delves deep into First Amendment protections but also has broad implications for online communications and interactions. Read more from your Fraser Trebilcock attorney.

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  1. Business Education Series – Maximizing Productivity: Strategies for More Effective Workdays

Productivity is a habit and it’s something you can become better at every day by choosing the methods and tricks that work for you.

Why it Matters: In the October Business Education Series program, Emmie Musser, Future of Work Strategist with TechSmith, is going to discuss some tried-and-true strategies for more productive and effective workdays. Learn more.

Related Practice Groups and Professionals

Cannabis Law | Sean Gallagher
Employee Benefits | Bob Burgee
Employee Benefits | Sharon Goldzweig
Criminal Law | Paula Spicer

Five Stories That Matter in Michigan This Week – September 29, 2023

  1. Detroit Mayor’s Land Value Tax Plan Moves to House Floor

Earlier it was covered that Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan spoke to lawmakers at the House Tax Policy Committee hearing on his land value tax plan. The Committee passed the proposed plan, and it now moves onto the House Floor.

Why it Matters: According to the plan laid out online, if enacted, would replace certain tax rates for homes and property structures with a higher rate of tax on land, with the purpose of targeting unused, unproductive, or vacant land while providing benefits to homeowners and businesses.

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  1. Momentum Builds for Michigan Clean Energy Bill

Clean energy bill sponsors in the Michigan Senate took public testimony during a committee hearing last week, as the Michigan legislature continues to push for comprehensive clean energy legislation. Among policies being debated include setting a carbon-free energy standard, reducing energy waste, increasing access to solar power, and expanding electric vehicle charging stations.

Why it Matters: Beyond environmental goals, access to significant federal funding hangs in the balance. In order to access certain funds allocated under the federal Inflation Reduction Act, states must adopt certain clean energy standards into law.

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  1. Employee Benefits Attorney

Fraser Trebilcock is seeking applications for a position in our Firm from well-qualified attorneys with strong experience in employee benefits, including employer sponsored retirement plans, employee health plans and general ERISA compliance.

Why it Matters: The successful candidate should have a solid and portable client base. Fraser will consider candidates who may lack a portable client base provided they have a solid background in these practice areas and demonstrate an aptitude for client service and growth. Learn more and to apply.

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  1. Michigan 2023 Cannabis Sales Through 6 Months Exceeds 2022 Sales by Almost $400 Million

Per data released by the Cannabis Regulatory Agency, through six months of sales in 2023, totaling $1,426,137,854.75, Michiganders have exceeded sales compared to 2022 data through six months, which totaled $1,029,451,152.66.  This is an almost $400 million increase through the first six months of this year.

Why it Matters: Marijuana sales remain strong in Michigan, particularly for recreational use. However, there still are significant concerns about profitability and market oversaturation that the industry is contending with.

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  1. Business Education Series – Maximizing Productivity: Strategies for More Effective Workdays

Productivity is a habit and it’s something you can become better at every day by choosing the methods and tricks that work for you.

Why it Matters: In the October Business Education Series program, Emmie Musser, Future of Work Strategist with TechSmith, is going to discuss some tried-and-true strategies for more productive and effective workdays. Learn more.

Related Practice Groups and Professionals

Real Estate | Jared Roberts
Energy Law | Mike Ashton
Cannabis Law | Sean Gallagher