Five Stories That Matter in Michigan This Week – April 12, 2024

  1. U of M Economists Project Michigan Economic Growth for Year Ahead

Economists from the University of Michigan recently released the annual Michigan Economic Outlook for 2024-25. The Outlook projects economic growth for the year ahead, including approximately 38,000 new jobs in 2024.

Why it Matters: This year’s expected job growth comes on the heels of a slowdown in employment in Michigan during the second half of last year, according to the report.

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  1. April Business Education Series

In the dynamic landscape of business, where adaptability is key, the importance of having robust Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) cannot be overstated. SOPs serve as the backbone of organizational efficiency, ensuring consistency, compliance, and continuous improvement.

Why it Matters: The April Business Education Series, “Optimizing Operations: The Crucial Role of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs),” led by Brittany Parks, founder and principal Consultant, Brittany Parks Process Consulting, is designed to equip participants with the knowledge, skills, and tools to harness the transformative power of SOPs in their respective organizations. Learn more and to register.

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  1. Michigan Cannabis Exceeds $288 Million in March ‘24

Cannabis sales surpassed $288 million in March, via the monthly report from the Michigan Cannabis Regulatory Agency. Michigan adult-use sales came in at $286,790,258.52, while medical sales came in at $2,053,021.25, totaling $288,843,279.77.

Why it Matters: Marijuana sales remain strong in Michigan, particularly for recreational use. However, there still are significant concerns about profitability and market oversaturation that the industry is contending with.

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  1. The Uniform Power of Attorney Act

The Uniform Power of Attorney Act (UPOAA or Act), 2023 PA 187, was signed into law in November 2023 and goes into effect July 1, 2024. It repeals Michigan’s current statutory law on durable powers of attorney, specifically Sections 700.5501-700.5505 of the Estates and Protected Individuals Code (EPIC). The UPOAA is not part of EPIC, instead, it is a stand-alone statute located at MCL 556.201 et. seq.

Why it Matters: The UPOAA will apply to all powers of attorney in Michigan beginning July 1, 2024, with certain exceptions. Read more from attorney Melisa M.W. Mysliwiec.

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  1. Ten Reasons Why You May Want to Consider a Family Cottage Succession Plan

The goal of cottage succession planning is to set up legal ground rules that provide the best chance to keep a cottage in the family for future generations.

Why it Matters: A cottage plan usually addresses concerns through the creative use of a limited liability company (LLC), or a trust (typically used for more favorable treatment associated with the uncapping of taxable value), to own the property. Learn more from cottage law attorney Mark Kellogg.

Related Practice Groups and Professionals

Cannabis Law | Sean Gallagher
Trusts & Estates | Melisa M.W. Mysliwiec
Cottage Law | Mark Kellogg

Five Stories That Matter in Michigan This Week – April 5, 2024

  1. New Michigan House Map Approved

A panel of three federal judges recently approved new voting districts for the Michigan House of Representatives after previously invalidating several districts within Detroit.

Why it Matters: The districts were revised because the panel previously found the Michigan redistricting commission’s redrawn districts were based predominantly on race in violation of the U.S. Constitution.

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  1. Ten Reasons Why You May Want to Consider a Family Cottage Succession Plan

The goal of cottage succession planning is to set up legal ground rules that provide the best chance to keep a cottage in the family for future generations.

Why it Matters: A cottage plan usually addresses concerns through the creative use of a limited liability company (LLC), or a trust (typically used for more favorable treatment associated with the uncapping of taxable value), to own the property. Learn more from cottage law attorney Mark Kellogg.

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  1. Snack Food Brand Sues Michigan Cannabis Companies Over Trademark Infringement

Better Made Snack Foods Inc, a Detroit based snack food company, is suing multiple Michigan cannabis companies over trademark infringement alleging that the companies knowingly and willingly sold cannabis products under the brand Better Smoke.

Why it Matters: Better Made is seeking monetary damages as well as an injunction to halt the sales of Better Smoke products.

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  1. A Health Professional’s Guide to Navigating the Disciplinary Process: What to Expect if You Are Facing a Professional Licensing Investigation or Administrative Complaint

Health professionals are committed to caring for patients with expertise, compassion, and integrity. However, in the heavily regulated healthcare field, those professionals can sometimes find themselves navigating not just the medical challenges of their patients but licensing issues of their own as well. Licensing issues can arise unexpectedly, and, when they do, they can cause tremendous stress and uncertainty.

Why it Matters: As an attorney with years of experience handling professional licensing matters for health professionals, Robert J. Andretz has witnessed firsthand how professional licensing investigations and Administrative Complaints can disrupt health professionals’ careers and their ability to provide patient care. He will explore how to navigate the disciplinary process in Michigan so that you can know what to expect if you are ever faced with a threat to your license. Learn more.

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  1. Corporate Transparency Act Update

As anticipated, the finding by a federal judge in Alabama that the Corporate Transparency Act is unconstitutional has prompted (or at least been echoed by) challenges elsewhere, including in federal courts in Maine and in Michigan. FinCEN filed its appeal notice in the Alabama suit earlier this month, meaning that a decision by the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals may be forthcoming. The suits in Maine and Michigan were brought in courts covered by the 5th and 6th Circuit Courts of Appeals, which could be the beginning of a series of events that brings the question of the CTA’s constitutionality before the United States Supreme Court as a result of a possible Circuit split.

Why it Matters: Reporting companies that were formed prior to January 1, 2024, may find it advantageous to continue collecting their beneficial owner information but postpone filing the report until some of these matters have worked through their respective processes. Entities created on or after January 1, 2024, however, will still need to file their reports within 90 days of filing their organizing documents, as their reporting obligations have not been excused. Learn more from attorney Bob Burgee.

Related Practice Groups and Professionals

Cannabis Law | Sean Gallagher
Cottage Law | Mark Kellogg
Health Care Law Robert Andretz
Business & Tax | Robert Burgee

Ten Reasons Why You May Want to Consider a Family Cottage Succession Plan

The goal of cottage succession planning is to set up legal ground rules that provide the best chance to keep a cottage in the family for future generations. A cottage plan usually addresses concerns through the creative use of a limited liability company (LLC), or a trust (typically used for more favorable treatment associated with the uncapping of taxable value), to own the property. Here are ten reasons why you and/or your family may want to consider a family cottage succession plan.

    1. Prevent a joint owner from forcing the sale of the cottage through an action for partition.
    2. An alternative to allowing common law rules dictate how the cottage operates.
    3. Prevent transfer of an interest in the cottage outside the family.
    4. Protect owners from creditor claims.
    5. Establish a framework for making decisions affecting the cottage.
    6. Provide sanctions for nonpayment of cottage expenses.
    7. A vehicle for an “endowment” (money set aside to fund cottage expenses).
    8. To require mediation or arbitration of family disputes.
    9. Allocate control of the cottage between or among generations of owners.
    10. May help delay (or avoid) the uncapping of Michigan property taxes.

These are the basics, but just as each family is different, each agreement can be tailored to fit specific needs.


Mark E. Kellogg’s breadth of knowledge and experience gives his clients unique insight into the special considerations associated with the cottage law practice. If you have any questions, you can reach out to Mark at mkellogg@fraserlawfirm.com or (517) 377.0890 for assistance.

Corporate Transparency Act Update

As anticipated, the finding by a federal judge in Alabama that the Corporate Transparency Act is unconstitutional has prompted (or at least been echoed by) challenges elsewhere, including in federal courts in Maine and in Michigan.

FinCEN filed its appeal notice in the Alabama suit earlier this month, meaning that a decision by the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals may be forthcoming. The suits in Maine and Michigan were brought in courts covered by the 5th and 6th Circuit Courts of Appeals, which could be the beginning of a series of events that brings the question of the CTA’s constitutionality before the United States Supreme Court as a result of a possible Circuit split. The matter could also make its way to the high Court in response to an injunction issued in one or more of these matters.

Therefore, reporting companies that were formed prior to January 1, 2024, may find it advantageous to continue collecting their beneficial owner information but postpone filing the report until some of these matters have worked through their respective processes. Entities created on or after January 1, 2024, however, will still need to file their reports within 90 days of filing their organizing documents, as their reporting obligations have not been excused.

This alert serves as a general summary and does not constitute legal guidance. Please contact us with any specific questions.


Robert D. Burgee is an attorney at Fraser Trebilcock with over a decade of experience counseling clients with a focus on corporate structures and compliance, licensing, contracts, regulatory compliance, mergers and acquisitions, and a host of other matters related to the operation of small and medium-sized businesses and non-profits. You can reach him at 517.377.0848 or at bburgee@fraserlawfirm.com.