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Video Surveillance Rules for Marijuana Licensees in Michigan

Marijuana licensees in Michigan must adhere to statutory mandates established by the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act and regulations promulgated by the Michigan Marijuana Regulatory Agency (“MRA”). One such requirement, as discussed in a recent MRA bulletin, is having a properly functioning surveillance system in place 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at all licensee locations.


Marijuana licensees in Michigan must adhere to statutory mandates established by the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act and regulations promulgated by the Michigan Marijuana Regulatory Agency (“MRA”). One such requirement, as discussed in a recent MRA bulletin, is having a properly functioning surveillance system in place 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at all licensee locations.

Surveillance systems must be able to record the following areas:

  • Where marijuana products are weighed, packed, stored, loaded, and unloaded for transportation, prepared, or moved.
  • Entrances and exits.
  • Point of sale or retail areas.
  • Security and back offices including rooms where the surveillance system itself is stored.
  • Anywhere marijuana or marijuana products are destroyed.

Failure to comply with the following requirements may result in disciplinary action.

Immediate response with recording is required

According to the MRA, a functioning, compliant surveillance allows for proper oversight of regulated products and businesses, and helps to ensure the safety of licensees, the licensee’s employees, and the general public. The MRA may request that a licensee provide a video surveillance recording, and if it does the licensee must provide it immediately, or at a later time approved by the agency.

Video surveillance must be maintained and stored for designated periods of time

Licensees must maintain surveillance recordings for 30 days, but the MRA may request that licensees maintain them for a longer period of time. Licensees should have the proper storage devices to provide to the agency on hand and should maintain backup copies of requested surveillance footage. Failure to comply with requests for video recordings may subject licensees to disciplinary proceedings.

Equipment must be working properly and staff training is advisable

Video surveillance equipment must be working properly at all times with a minimum resolution of 720p. In addition, surveillance logs must be updated and accurate. The name of the employee or business owner responsible for monitoring the system must also be made available. The MRA recommends that a licensee designate at least one employee to be trained in using the video surveillance system so that licensees can comply with all requests for the preservation and production of video surveillance.

Suspending operations if surveillance system isn’t working

The MRA recommends that a licensee discontinue operations if its surveillance system isn’t working due to a power loss or otherwise. Any surveillance system must be equipped with a failure notification system that provides notification to the licensee of any interruption or failure of the video surveillance system or video surveillance system storage device. Again, operating without the required video surveillance coverage in place may subject the licensee to disciplinary action.

Final thoughts for licensees

Obtaining and maintaining a license to legally operate a business under the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act requires a clear understanding of the rules and regulations, and continual operational vigilance by entrepreneurs and their employees. The detailed rules concerning video surveillance are just one example of the types of issues that must be addressed and adhered to. If you have any questions or require assistance as a licensee in Michigan, please contact Paul Mallon or your Fraser Trebilcock attorney.


mallon-paulPaul C. Mallon, Jr.  is Shareholder and Chair of Fraser Trebilcock’s cannabis law practice. You can reach him at pmallon@fraserlawfirm.com or (313) 965-9043.